Could weight eventually be a term of employment?

Curt Schilling, a pitcher with the Boston Red Sox, has agreed to stay on for another year. In addition to $3 million in potential performance bonuses, he can make an extra $2 million by meeting certain weight goals in the contract. It seems like they want Curt trim and fit. The thinner he is, the more money he makes.

ACCOMMODATING BREASTFEEDING MOTHERS, EMPLOYERS HAVE THE RIGHT TO A CLEAR RULE

In recent years, the literature supporting the importance of breastfeeding has grown. More and more mothers are breastfeeding their children for as long as possible. As this trend continues, employers are going to be asked more often to make accommodations for mothers who are returning to work but want to continue to breastfeed.
 

DEFINING HARASSMENT, SEXUAL AND OTHER

There is a commonly held mistaken belief that there is a law against harassing employees.  In fact, there really is no such law.  It is almost astounding how often I hear of situations in which employees are accusing their employer of harassment.  The term harassment is used as if the very utterance of the phrase should make employers quake in their boots.  The phrase is spoken as if harassment is a legal concept recognized by all courts and leading to dire consequences for the perpetrator.  None of this is the case.  The only legal context in which harassment has any meaning is the Ontario Human Rights Code.  It prohibits sexual harassment and harassment generally on the basis of one’s age, colour, creed, etc.  If you are being harassed as a result of one of those factors, there are indeed legal consequences for that behaviour.