Employer should not lie to Employer Insurance

Employers should be wary of fiddling with the truth in order to help a former employee receive Employment Insurance benefits.

Not happy? Look for a new job

QUESTION: I have worked with my present employer for 9 years. I have not had a raise in 4 years. My hiring letter said that I would get a performance review every year but that has never happened. I strongly suspect that my co-workers are getting regular raises. Whenever I raise this with my boss I get “not this year”. Whenever I ask for a performance review like my hiring letter said I would get, I get put off. Isn’t my employer breaching my contract? Don’t they have to give me a performance review like they promised and an appropriate raise?

Constructive Dismissal - Employers must give notice of big changes

The vast majority of constructive dismissal cases involve a loss of pay or prestige. When big changes come without appropriate notice, the employee has the right to leave and sue for constructive dismissal. Constructive dismissal cases, can be about far more important things than pay and prestige.

DRAFTING EFFECTIVE NON-SOLICITATION PROVISIONS

For many businesses, relationships with clients are a primary asset. Protecting that asset is crucial to long term success.

EI AND PENSION - WHAT IS YOUR ENTITLEMENT?

As has been reported in this paper, Stelco is undergoing some belt tightening and has offered voluntary severance packages to a number of senior employees. If they sign off and leave their employment, they get a year’s pay and other perks. But, are they eligible for Employment Insurance?

WARNING LETTERS - WHAT TO DO

So you just got a nasty warning letter from your new boss. She has listed a series of complaints about your performance and ended the letter by indicating that failure to improve may lead to disciplinary action including termination. Most of the allegations are untrue or unfounded.

SMOKE FREE ONTARIO

The Smoke-Free Ontario Act and its regulations were in effect as of two days ago. There are many provisions but today I am going to attempt provide employers and employees with a guide  to the impact on most workplaces.
 

Employment contracts should clearly set out commission structure

In most situations where employment ends, figuring out what is owed to the employee is quite easy: They are owed their outstanding earnings up to the date of resignation as well as outstanding vacation pay.

Employment contracts should clearly set out commission structure

In most situations where employment ends, figuring out what is owed to the employee is quite easy: They are owed their outstanding earnings up to the date of resignation as well as outstanding vacation pay.

Is it a Constructive Dismissal and How do you handle the commissions?

QUESTION: For 8 years I have been paid a combination of salary plus commission. When the last fiscal year ended, my employer told me that in the future I would not be receiving commission but only straight salary. My salary was increased. A month later, the previous year’s results came in and I realized that I had had a stellar year. While I got paid my salary and commission for the last fiscal year, I realized that if my sales continued the way they were, I would have been far better off with the combination of salary and commission, even though my salary had been increased as a result of the recent change. Have I been constructively dismissed? Is there anything I can short of suing for wrongful dismissal to get this loss of money back?